Diotima Greek Drama Bibliography

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Diotima Greek Drama Bibliography
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Diotima Greek Drama Bibliography

  • Adams, J.N., "Female Speech in Latin Comedy," Antichthon. Journal of the Australian Society for Classical Studies (1984) 43-77
  • W. S. Anderson, "Love Plots in Menander and His Roman Adapters," Ramus 13 (1984) 124-34
  • D. Armstrong and E. A. Ratchford, "Iphigenia's Veil: Aeschylus, Agamemnon 228-48," BICS 32 (1985) 1-12
  • D. Armstrong, "Sophocles' Trachiniae 559ff.," BICS 33 (1986) 101-2
  • J. Assael, "Misogynie et feminisme chez Aristophane et chez Euripide," Pallas 32 (1985) 91-103
  • Bain, David, "Female Speech in Menander," Antichthon. Journal of the Australian Society for Classical Studies 18 (1984) 24-42
  • S. A. Barlow, "Stereotype and Reversal in Euripides' Medea," Hermes 118 (1990) 502-505
  • S. A. Barlow, "Stereotype and Reversal in Euripides' Medea," Greece & Rome 36 (1989) 158-171 / full text
  • S.A. Barlow, "Euripides' Medea: a subversive play?," BICS Supplement edited by A. Griffiths 66, London (1995) 36-45 / bmcr
  • Francine Viret Bernal, "When Painters Execute a Murderess: The Representation of Clytemnestra on Attic Vases," in Naked Truths: Women, Sexuality and Gender in Classical Art and Archaeology edited by Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow and Claire L. Lyons, London: Routledge (1997) / web link  / bmcr
  • G. G. Betts, "The Silence of Alcestis," Mnemosyne 18 (1965) 181-182
  • C. R. Beye, "Alcestis and Her Critics," GRBS 2 (1959) 109-127
  • D. Boedeker, "Euripides' Medea and the Vanity of Logoi," Classical Philology 86 (1991) 95-112 / full text
  • E. Bongie, "Heroic Elements in the Medea of Euripides," Transactions of the American Philological Association 107 (1977) 27-56 / full text
  • S. de Bouvrie, Women in Greek Tragedy: An Anthropological Approach, Oslo: Norwegian University Press (1990)
  • A. M. Bowie, Aristophanes. Myth, Ritual and Comedy, Cambridge (1993) / bmcr
  • Laurel Bowman, "Klytaimnestra's Dream: Prophecy in Sophocles' Electra," Phoenix 51 no. 2 (1998) [The use of prophecy in Sophocles' Elektra emphasizes the play's primarily political theme, the transfer of power from father to son. The lack of direct reference to Klytaimnestra in Apollo's oracle, and Klytaimnestra's absence from her own prophetic dream are mirrored in her exclusion and Electra's from the political activity of the play, and give prominence to the actions of the males, Orestes and Aegisthus.]
  • E. M. Bradley, "Admetus and the Triumph of Failure in Euripides' Alcestis," Ramus 9 (1980) 112-127
  • A. L. Brown, "The Erinyes in the Oresteia: Real Life, the Supernatural, and the Stage," Journal of Hellenic Studies 103 (1983) 13-34 / full text
  • P. Brown, "Plots and Prostitutes in Greek New Comedy," Pap. of Leeds Int'l Seminar 6 (1990) 241-66
  • P. Brown, "Love and Marriage in Greek New Comedy," Classical Quarterly 43 (1993) 184-205 / full text
  • W. Burkert, "Greek Tragedy and Sacrificial Ritual," GRBS 7 (1966) 87-121
  • A. Burnett, "Medea and the Tragedy of Revenge," Classical Philology 68.1 (1973) / full text
  • A. P. Burnett, "The Virtues of Admetus," Classical Philology 60 (1965) 240-255 / full text
  • B. Carroll, "Feminism and Pacifism: Historical and Theoretical Connections," in Women and Peace: Theoretical, Historical, and Practical Perspectives edited by R. R. Pierson, London (1987) 2-28
  • J. J. Clauss and S. I. Johnston, Medea: Essays on Medea in Myth, Literature, Philosophy and Art, Princeton (1997)
  • S. G. Cole, "Procession and Celebration at the Dionysia," in Theater and Society in the Classical World edited by R. Scodel (1993) 25-38
  • W. R. Connor, "Tribes, Festivals, and Processions," Journal of Hellenic Studies 107 (1987) 40-50 / full text
  • F. M. Cornford, The Origin of Attic Comedy (1914, republished with introduction by J. Henderson 1993)
  • E. M. Craik, "Language of Sexuality and Sexual Inversion in Euripides' Hippolytus," Acta Classica 41 (1998) 29-44
  • E. Csapo and W. J. Slater, The Context of Ancient Drama, Ann Arbor, Michigan: The University of Michigan Press (1995) / bmcr
  • Eric Csapo, "Riding the Phallus for Dionysus: Iconology, Ritual, and Gender-Role De/construction," Phoenix 51 no. 3-4 (1997) 253-95 [Iconographic, cultic, and literary evidence reveals the existence of a rite of phallus-pole riding practiced in several Dionysiac mysteries in Central Greece and the Peloponnese. Greek writers, with some reason, derived the rite from Egypt. The rite is explained as an expression of Dionysiac 'interstructure.']
  • M.L. Cunningham, "Aeschylus, Agamemnon 231-47," BICS 31 (1984:) 9-12
  • D. Auger, M. Rosellini, and S. Said, Aristophane, les femmes et la cité (1979)
  • E. David, Aristophanes and Athenian Society of the Early Fourth Century B.C., Mnemosyne Supplement 81 (1984)
  • M. Davies, "Deianeira and Medea: a Footnote to the Pre-history of Two Myths," Mnemosyne 48 (1989) 469-471
  • C.W. Dearden, "Pots, Tumblers, and Phlyax Vases," BICS Supplement 66 edited by A. Griffiths, London (1995) / bmcr
  • M. Deforest, "Clytemnestra's Breast and the Evil Eye," in Woman's Power, Man's Game. Essays on Classical Antiquity in Honor of Joy King edited by M. DeForest (1993)
  • M. Detienne, "Les Danaides entre elles ou La Violence Fondatrice du Mariage," Arethusa 21 (1988) 159-75
  • M. Dillon, "The Lysistrata as a Post-Deceleian Peace Play," Transactions of the American Philological Association 117 (1987) 97-104 / full text
  • Lillian E. Doherty, Gender and the Interpretation of Classical Myth, London: Duckworth (2001) [ISBN 0-7156-3042-3] / bmcr
  • J. Dolan, "Gender Impersonation Onstage: Destroying or Maintaining the Mirror of Gender Roles?," Women and Performance 2 (1985) 5-12
  • K. J. Dover, Aristophanic Comedy (1972)
  • M. Dyson, "Alcestis' Children and the Character of Admetus," Journal of Hellenic Studies 108 (1988) 13-23 / full text
  • P. Easterling, "Women in Tragic Space," BICS 34 (1987) 15-26
  • P. E. Easterling, "The Infanticide in Euripides' Medea," YCS 25 (1977) 177-191
  • V. Ehrenberg, The People of Aristophanes: A Sociology of Old Attic Comedy (1968)
  • S. Eitrem, "Les Thesmophoria, les Skirophoria, et les Arrhetophoria," Symbolae Osloenses 23 (1944) 32-45
  • G. W. Elderkin, "Aphrodite and Athena in the Lysistrata of Aristophanes," Classical Philology 35 (1940) 387-396 / full text
  • E. Fantham, "Sex, Status, and Survival in Hellenistic Athens: A Study of Women in New Comedy," Phoenix 29 (1975) 44-74
  • C. A. Faraone, "Sex and Power: Male-Targeting Aphrodisiacs in the Greek Magical Tradition," Helios 19 (1992) 92-103
  • C. A. Faraone, "Deianira's Mistake and the Demise of Heracles: Erotic Magic in Sophocles Trachiniae," Helios 21.2 (1994) 115-135
  • Christopher A. Faraone, "Salvation and female heroics in the parodos of Aristophanes' Lysistrata," Journal of Hellenic Studies 117 (1997) / full text
  • R. Finnegan, "Women in Aristophanic Comedy," Platon 42 (1990) 100-106
  • Judith Fletcher, "Women and Oaths in Euripides," Theatre Journal 55.1 (2003) 29-44
  • Judith Fletcher, "Sacrificial Bodies and the Body of the Text in Aristophanes' Lysistrata," Ramus: Critical Studies in Greek and Roman Literature 28.2 (1999) 108-125
  • Judith Fletcher, "Exchanging Glances: Vision and Representation in Aeschylus' Agamemnon," Helios 26.1 (1999) 11-34
  • H. Foley, "The Concept of Women in Athenian Drama," in Reflections of Women in Antitquity, New York (1981) 127-68
  • H. Foley, "Anodos Drama: Euripides' Alcestis and Helen," in Innovations of Antiquity edited by R. Hexter and D. Selden, New York and London
  • H. Foley, "Medea's Divided Self," Classical Antiquity 8 (1989) 61-85
  • H. P. Foley, "The Female Intruder Reconsidered: Women in Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Ecclesiazusae," Classical Philology 77 (1982) 1-21 / full text
  • Foley, Helene, Female Acts in Greek Tragedy, Princeton: Princeton University Press (2001) [Chapters: I. The Politics of Tragic Lamentation, II. The Contradictions of Tragic Marriage, III. Women as Moral Agents in Greek Tragedy, III.1. Virgins, Wives, and Mothers; Penelope as Paradigm, III.2. Sacrificial Virgins: The Ethics of Lamentation in Sophocles' Electra, III.3. Sacrificial Virgins: Antigone as Moral Agent, III4. Tragic Wives: Clytemnestras, III.5. Tragic Wives: Medea's Divided Self, III.6. Tragic Mothers: Maternal Persuasion in Euripides, IV Anodos Dramas: Euripides' Alcestis and Helen ] / web link
  • R. L. Fowler, "How the Lysistrata Works," EMC 15.2 (1996) 245-251
  • Lin Foxhall and John Salmon (eds.), Thinking Men: Masculinity and its Self-Representation in the Classical Tradition, London and New York: Routledge (1998) [CONTENTS: Lin Foxhall, "Introduction" Matthew Fox, "The constrained man" Robin Osborne, "Sculpted men of Athens: masculinity and power in the field of vision" Emma J. Stafford, "Masculine values, feminine forms: on the gender of personified abstractions" Lin Foxhall, "Natural sex: the attribution of sex and gender to plants in ancient Greece" Margaret Williamson, "Eros the blacksmith: performing masculinity in Anakreon's love lyrics" Richard Hawley, "The male body as spectacle in Attic drama" Alan H. Sommerstein, "Rape and young manhood in Athenian comedy" Angela Heap, "Understanding the men in Menander" Karen F. Pierce, "Ideals of masculinity in New Comedy" Jonathan Walters, "Juvenal, Satire 2: putting male sexual deviants on show" Mary Harlow, "In the name of the father: procreation, paternity and patriarchy" Gillian Clark, "The old Adam: the Fathers and the unmaking of masculinity" Felicity Rosslyn, "The hero of our time: classic heroes and post-classical drama" ] / bmcr  / bmcr
  • Lin Foxhall and John Salmon, Thinking Men: Masculinity and its Self-Representation in the Classical Tradition, London and New York: Routledge (1998)
  • Gamel, M.-K., "Staging Ancient Drama: The Difference Women Make," SyllClass 6 (1999) 22-42
  • J. F. Gardner, "Aristophanes and Male Anxiety -- the Defence of the Oikos," Greece & Rome 36 (1989) 51-62 / full text
  • G. Gellie, "The Character of Medea," BICS 35 (1988)
  • B. Goff, "The Women of Thebes," CJ 90.4 (1995) 353-65
  • B. Goff, The Noose of Words: Readings of Desire, Violence, and Language in Euripides' Hippolytos, Cambridge (1990)
  • Goff, Barbara, "Aithra at Eleusis," Helios 22.1 (1995) 65-78 / web link
  • B. Goldfarb, "The Conflict of Obligations in Euripides' Alcestis," GRBS 33 (1992) 109ff.
  • S. Goldhill, "Representing Democracy: Women at the Great Dionysia," in Ritual, Finance, Politics. Athenian Democratic Accounts Presented to David Lewis edited by Robin Osborne and Simon Hornblower, Oxford (1994) 347-370 / bmcr
  • S. Goldhill, "The Great Dionysia and Civic Ideology," Journal of Hellenic Studies 107 (1987) 58-76 / full text
  • S. Goldhill, Language, Sexuality, Narrative: The Oresteia, Princeton (1984)
  • A. W. Gomme, "Aristophanes and Politics," Classical Review 52 (1938) 97-109 / full text
  • Griffith, R. Drew, "Architecture of a Kiss: The Vocabulary of Attic Old Comedy," GRBS 35.4 (1994) 339-344
  • J. A. Haldane, "A Scene in the Thesmophoriazusae (295-371)," Philologus 109 (1965) 39-46
  • E. M. Hall, "The Archer Scene in Aristophanes' Thesmophoriazusae," Philologus 133 (1989) 38-54
  • Edith Hall, Fiona Macintosh and Oliver Taplin, Medea in Performance 1500-2000, Oxford: Legenda (2000) / bmcr
  • S. Halliwell, "The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture," Classical Quarterly 41 (1991) 279-296 / full text
  • J. H. Hanson, "Aristophanes' Thesm. Theme, Structure, and Production," Philologus 120 (1976) 165-185
  • R. Harriot, "Aristophanes' Audience and the Plays of Euripides," BICS 9 (1962) 1-8
  • R. M. Harriot, Aristophanes, Poet and Dramatist (1986)
  • R. M. Harriot, "Lysistrata. Action and Theme," in Themes in Drama. Vol. 7, Drama, Sex, and Politics edited by J. Redmond (1985) 11-22
  • L. Hatzichronoglou, Euripides' Medea: Woman or Fiend? edited by M. DeForest (1993)
  • M. Heath, Political Comedy in Aristophanes (1987)
  • J. Henderson, "Aristophanes. Essays in Interpretation," YCS 26 (1980)
  • J. Henderson, Aristophanes: Lysistrata (1987)
  • J. Henderson, "'Lysistrate': The Play and its Themes," YCS 26 (1980) 153-218
  • J. Henderson, The Maculate Muse: Obscene Language in Attic Comedy (1975)
  • J. Henderson, "Older Women in Attic Old Comedy," Transactions of the American Philological Association 117 (1987) 105-129 / full text
  • J. Henderson, "The Demos and the Comic Competition," in Nothing to Do With Dionysos? Athenian Drama in its Social Context edited by J. Winkler and F. Zeitlin, Princeton (1990) 270-313
  • J. Henderson, "Women and the Athenian Dramatic Festivals," Transactions of the American Philological Association 121 (1991) 133-147 / full text
  • J. Henderson, Three Plays by Aristophanes. Staging Women, New York and London: Routledge (1996) / bmcr
  • M. R. Higonnet, Euripides' Alcestis: How to Die a Normal Death in Greek Tragedy edited by S. W. Goodwin and E. Bronfen (1993)
  • T. F. Hoey, "Sun Symbolism in the Parodos of the Trachiniae," Arethusa 5 (1972) 133-155
  • J. C. Hogan, "The Protagonists of the Antigone," Arethusa 5 (1972) 93-104
  • R. Hopper, "A Note on Aristophanes, Lysistrata 665-70," Classical Quarterly 10 (1960) 665-70 / full text
  • T. K. Hubbard, "Women in the City," in The Mask of Comedy. Aristophanes and the Intertextual Parabasis (1991) 182-199 / bmcr
  • A. O. Hulton, "The Women on the Acropolis: a Note on the Structure of the Lysistrata," Greece & Rome 19 (1972) 32-36 / full text
  • W. M. Calder III, "The Protagonist of Sophocles' Antigone," Arethusa 4.1 (1971 49) [cf. A. D. Fitton Brown, "A Reply," Arethusa 4 (1971) 52-54]
  • J. P. Johansen, "The Thesmophoria as a Women's Festival," Temenos 11 (1975) 78-87
  • Patricia J. Johnson, "Woman's Third Face: A Psycho/Social Reconsideration of Antigone," Arethusa 30 no. 3 (1997) 369-98 / web link
  • S. Iles Johnston, "Xanthus, Hera and the Erinyes (Il. 19.400-18)," Transactions of the American Philological Association 122 (1992) 85-98 / full text
  • L. J. Jost, "Antigone's Engagement: A Theme Delayed," LCM (1983) 8-9
  • H. P. Karydas, Eurykleia and Her Successors: Female Figures of Authority in Greek Poetics, Lanham, MD (1998) / bmcr
  • M. A. Katz, "The Character of Greek Tragedy: Women and the Greek Imagination," Arethusa 27 (1994) 81-103
  • Marilyn A. Katz, "Did the Women of Ancient Athens Attend the Theater in the Eighteenth Century?," Classical Philology 93 no. 2 (1998) 105ff. / full text
  • M. L. Kilmer, "Genital Phobia and Depilation," Journal of Hellenic Studies 102 (1982) 104-112 / web link  / full text
  • R. Kitzinger, "Why Mourning Becomes Electra," ClAnt 10 (1991) 298-327
  • B. Knox, "The Medea of Euripides," YCS 25 (1977) [= B. Knox Word and Action. Essays on the Ancient Theater, 1979 295-322]
  • D. Konstan, Greek Comedy and Ideology, Oxford: Oxford University Press (1995) / bmcr
  • Konstan, D., "Aristophanes' Lysistrata: Women and the Body Politic," in Tragedy, Comedy, and the Polis edited by A. Sommerstein, S. Halliwell, J. Henderson and B. Zimmermann, Bari (1993)
  • Konstan, David, "Between Courtesan and Wife: Menander's Perikeiromene," Phoenix 41 (1987) 122ff.
  • D. Kovacs, "On Medea's Great Monologue (E. Med. 1021-80)," Classical Quarterly 36 (1986) 343-352 / full text
  • D. Kovacs, "Zeus in Euripides' Medea," American Journal of Philology 114.1 (1993 45) / full text
  • P. Krentz, "Athens' Allies and the Phallophoria," AHB 7.1 (1993) 12-16
  • E. Lé.vy, "Les femmes chez Aristophane," Ktema 1 (1976) 99-112
  • Lape, Susan, "Democratic Ideology and the Poetics of Rape in Menandrian Comedy," ClAnt 20.1 (2001) 79-120
  • Lardinois, André and Laura McClure, Making Silence Speak. Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press (2001) / bmcr
  • D. Levine, "Lysistrata and Bacchae: Structure, Genre, and 'Women on Top'," Helios 14 (1987) 29-38
  • D. M. Lewis, "Notes on Attic Inscriptions (II) XXIII. Who Was Lysistrata?," ABSA L (1955) 1-12
  • F. Lissarague, "Why Satyrs are Good to Represent," in Nothing to Do With Dionysos? Athenian Drama in its Social Context edited by J. Winkler and F. Zeitlin, Princeton (1990) 228-236
  • M. Lloyd, "Euripides' Alcestis," Greece & Rome 32 (1985) 119-131 / full text
  • H. Lloyd-Jones, "Artemis and Iphigenia," Journal of Hellenic Studies 103 (1983) 87-102 / full text
  • H. Lloyd-Jones, "Erinyes, Semnai Theai, Eumenides," in Owls to Athens. Essays on Classical Subjects in Honor of Sir Kenneth Dover edited by E. M. Craik (1990) 203-211
  • T. Long, "Persuasion and the Aristophanic Agon," Transactions of the American Philological Association 103 (1972) 285-299 / full text
  • N. Loraux, The Children of Athena: Athenian Ideas about Citizenship and the Division between the Sexes, Princeton (1993) / bmcr
  • N. Loraux, Mothers in Mourning, with the essay 'Of Amnesty and Its Opposite', Ithaca: Cornell UP (1998) / bmcr
  • N. Loraux, "The Comic Acropolis: Aristophanes, Lysistrata," in The Children of Athena: Athenian Ideas about Citizenship and the Division between the Sexes, Princeton (1993) 147-183 / bmcr
  • N. Loraux, "L'Acropole comique," Ancient Society 11 (1980) 119-50
  • N. Loraux, Tragic Ways of Killing a Woman (1987)
  • N. Loraux, "Herakles: The Super-Male and the Feminine," in Before Sexuality: The Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient World edited by D. M. Halperin, J. J. Winkler and F. I. Zeitlin, Princeton (1990) 34-40
  • C. A. E. Luschnig, "Interiors: imaginary spaces in Alcestis and Medea," Mnemosyne 45 (1992) 19-44
  • C.A.E Luschnig, The Gorgon's Severed Head. Studies in Alcestis, Electra and Phoenissae, Leiden: E. J. Brill (1995) / web link  / bmcr
  • D. M. MacDowell, Aristophanes and Athens: an Introduction to the Plays, Oxford: Oxford University Press (1995) / bmcr
  • A. Machin, "L'autre Antigone," Pallas 44 (1996) 47-56
  • J. Maitland, "Dynasty and Family in the Athenian City State: A View from Attic Tragedy," Classical Quarterly 42.1 (1992 26) / full text
  • J. March, "Euripides the Misogynist?," in Euripides, Women, and Sexuality edited by A. Powell, London and New York (1990) 32-75 / bmcr
  • J. S. Margon, "The Nurse's View of Clytemnestra's Grief for Orestes: Choeph. 737-740," CW 76 (1983) 296-297
  • R. P. Martin, "Fire on the Mountain: Lysistrata and the Lemnian Women," CA
  • McClure, L.K., "Female speech and characterization in Euripides," in Lo spettacolo delle voci edited by Francesco De Martino and Alan H. Sommerstein, Bari: Levante editori (1995) 35-60
  • Laura McClure, Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama, Princeton: Princeton University Press (1999) / bmcr
  • Laura McClure, Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World: Blackwell Publishers (2002) [1. Editor's Introduction: Laura McClure. Part I: Greece: 2. Classical Attitudes to Sexual Behaviour: K. J. Dover. Excerpt:: Aristophanes' Speech from Plato, Symposium 189d7-192a1. 3. Double-Consciousness in Sappho's Lyrics: J. J. Winkler. Excerpt:s: Sappho 1 and 31; Homer, Iliad 5.114-132; Odyssey 6.139-85. 4. Bound to Bleed: Artemis and Greek Women: H. King. Excerpts: Hippocrates, On Unmarried Girls; Euripides, Hippolytus 59-105. 5. Playing the Other: Theater, Theatricality, and the Feminine in Greek Drama: F. Zeitlin. Excerpts: Sophocles, Women of Trachis 531-587, 1046-1084; Euripides, Bacchae 912-944. Part II: Rome: 6. The Silent Women of Rome: M. I. Finley. Excerpts: Funerary Inscriptions: CE 81.1-2, 158.2, 843, 1136.3-4; ILS 5213, 8402, 8394; CIL 1.1211, 1.1221, 1.1837. 7. The Body Female and the Body Politic: Livy's Lucretia and Verginia: S. R. Joshel. Excerpts: Livy, On the Founding of Rome, 1.57.6-59.6. 8. Mistress and Metaphor in Augustan Elegy: M. Wyke. Excerpts: Propertius, 1.8a-b and 2.5; Cicero, In Defense of Marcus Caelius 20.47-21.50. 9. Pliny's Brassiere. Excerpt:: Pliny, Natural History 28.70-82. Part III: Classical Tradition: 10. "The Voice of the Shuttle Is Ours." P. K. Joplin. Excerpt: Ovid, Metamorphoses 6.424-623.] / bmcr
  • E. A. McDermott, Euripides' Medea: the Incarnation of Disorder (1989)
  • Daniel Mendelsohn, Gender and the City in Euripides' Political Plays, Oxford (2002) [ISBN 0-19-924956-3] / bmcr
  • A. Michelini, "Characters and Character Change in Aeschylus: Klytaimestra and the Furies," Ramus 8 (1979) 153-164
  • H. W. Miller, "Some Tragic Influences in the Thesmophoriazusae of Aristophanes," Transactions of the American Philological Association 77 (1946) 171-82 / full text
  • H. W. Miller, "On the Parabasis of the Thesmophoriazusae of Aristophanes," Classical Philology 42 (1947) 180-181 / full text
  • S. P. Mills, "The Sorrows of Medea," Classical Philology 75 (1980) 289-296 / full text
  • R. W. Minadeo, "Characterization and Theme in the Antigone," Arethusa 18 (1985) 133-154
  • Tim Moore, Drama in the Roman Republic: Getting Started / web link
  • K. Morgan, "Agamemnon 1391-1392: Clytemnestra's Defense Foreshadowed," QUCC 42 (1992) 25-27
  • C. Moulton, "Poetry and Imitation in the Thesmophoriazusae," in Aristophanic Comedy (1981)
  • F. Muecke, "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman," Classical Quarterly 32 (1982) 41-55 / full text
  • S. Murnaghan, "Antigone 904-920 and the Institution of Marriage," American Journal of Philology 107 (1986) 192-207 / full text
  • Neblung, Dagmar, "Die Gestalt der Kassandra in der antiken Literatur," Beitraege zur Altertumskunde 97, Stuttgart, Leipzig (1997)
  • M. Neuburg, "How Like a Woman: Antigone's 'Inconsistency'," Classical Quarterly 40 (1990) 54-76 / full text
  • H.-J. Newiger, "War and Peace in the Comedy of Aristophanes," YCS 26 (1980) 219-237
  • D. O'Higgins, "Above Rubies: Admetus' Perfect Wife," Arethusa 26 (1993) 77-97
  • K. Ormand, "More Wedding Imagery: Trachiniae 1053ff," Mnemosyne 46 (1993) 224-226
  • R. Padel, In and Out of the Mind: Greek Images of the Tragic Self, Princeton (1992) / bmcr
  • R. B. Palmer, "An Apology for Jason: A Study of Euripides' Medea," CJ 53 (1981) 49-55
  • A. Panagopoulos, "Aristophanes and Euripides on the Victims of the War," BICS 32 (1985)
  • M. Parca, "Of Nature and Eros: Deianeira in Sophocles' Trachiniae," ICS 17 (1992) 175-192
  • A. J. Podlecki, "Could Women Attend the Theater in Ancient Athens?," Ancient World 21 (1990) 27-43
  • A. J. Podlecki, "Aeschylus' Women," Helios 10 (1983) 23-47
  • John Porter, Skenotheke: Images of the Ancient Stage [nice collection of resources on ancient theater] / web link
  • John Porter, A Bibliography of Ancient Drama / web link
  • A. Powell, Euripides, Women, and Sexuality, London and New York (1990) / bmcr
  • D. C. Pozzi, "Deianeira's Robe: Diction in Sophocles' Trachiniae," Mnemosyne 47 (1995) 577-585
  • D. C. Pozzi, "DEIANIRA VERE OINEI FILIA," Hermes 124.1 (1996) 104-108
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  • N. S. Rabinowitz, Anxiety Veiled: Euripides and the Traffic in Women (1993) / bmcr
  • K. J. Reckford, Aristophanes' Old-and-New Comedy, vol. 1, Six Essays in Perspective (1987)
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  • R. Rehm, Marriage to Death. The Conflation of Wedding and Funeral Rituals in Greek Tragedy, Princeton (1994) / bmcr
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  • A. R. Rose, "The Significance of the Nurse's Speech in Aeschylus' Choephoroi," CB 58 (1982) 49-50
  • Vincent J. Rosivach, When a Young Man Falls in Love: The Sexual Exploitation of Women in New Comedy, London and New York: Routledge (1998) / web link
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  • R. Seaford, "The Imprisonment of Women in Greek Tragedy," Journal of Hellenic Studies 110 (1990) 76-90 / full text
  • R. Seaford, Reciprocity and Ritual. Homer and Tragedy in the Developing City-State, Oxford: Clarendon Press (1994) / bmcr
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  • R. Seager, "Aristophanes' Thesmophoriazusae 493-6 and the Comic Possibilities of Garlic," Philologus 127 (1983) 139-142
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  • C. Segal, Sophocles' Tragic World, Cambridge, MA (1995)
  • C. Segal, "Antigone: Death and Love, Hades and Dionysus," in Oxford Readings in Greek Tragedy edited by E. Segal (1983) 167-176
  • C. Segal, "Time, Oracles, and Marriage in the Trachiniae," Lexis (1992) 9-10
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  • David Sick, "Ummidia Quadratilla: Cagey Businesswoman or Lazy Pantomime Watcher?," Classical Antiquity 30 (1999) / web link
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  • C. H. Whitman, Aristophanes and the Comic Hero (1964)
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  • Wiles, David, "Greek Theatre and the Legitimation of Slavery," in Slavery and other Forms of unfree Labour edited by Léonie J. Archer, London and New York: Routledge (1988) 53-67
  • M. Williamson, "A Woman's Place in Euripides' Medea," in Euripides, Women, and Sexuality edited by A. Powell, London and New York (1990) 16-31 / bmcr
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  • J. Winkler and F. Zeitlin, Nothing to Do With Dionysos? Athenian Drama in its Social Context, Princeton (1990)
  • R. P. Winnington-Ingram, "Sophocles and Women," in Entretiens sur l'antiquité classique. Fondation Hardt 29 (1982) 233-257
  • T. Woodard, "The Electra of Sophocles," in Sophocles edited by T. Woodard, New Jersey (1966) 125-45 [one of few articles to focus on Electra herself]
  • N. Worman, "The Body as Argument: Helen in Four Greek Texts," Classical Antiquity 16.1 (1997) 151ff.
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  • Maria Wyke, Parchments of gender: deciphering the bodies of antiquity, Oxford: Clarendon Press (1998) [Introduction Maria Wyke; 1. Ithyphallic Males Behaving Badly; or, Satyr Drama as Gendered Tragic Ending Edith Hall; 2. `The Mother of the Argument': Eros and the Body in Sappho and Plato's Phaedrus Helene P. Foley; 3. Talking Recipes in the Gynaecological Texts of the Hippocratic Corpus Ann Ellis Hanson; 4. Controlling Daughters' Bodies in Sirach Jon L. Berquist; 5. Austerity, Excess, Success, and Failure in Hellenistic and Early Imperial Italy Emma Dench; 6. Poisonous Women and Unnatural History in Roman Culture Sarah Currie; 7. Discovering the Body in Roman Oratory Erik Gunderson; 8. The Emperor's New Body: Ascension from Rome Mary Beard John Henderson; 9. `Ordering the House': On the Domestication of Jewish Bodies Cynthia M. Baker; 10. Playing Roman Soldiers: The Martyred Body, Derek Jarman's Sebastiane, and the Representation of Male Homosexuality Maria Wyke; 11. Sowing the Seeds of Violence: Rape, Women, and the Land Carol Dougherty ] / web link
  • L. Wysocki, "Aristophanes, Thucydides Book VIII and the Political Events of 413-411," Eos 76 (1988) 237-248
  • F. Zeitlin, "Travesties of Gender and Genre in Aristophanes' Thesmophoriazusae," Classical Reviewitical Inquiry 8 (1981) 301-27 [also in H. Foley (ed.), Reflections of Women in Antiquity, 169-217]
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  • F. Zeitlin, "Playing the Other: Theater, Theatricality and the Feminine in Greek Drama," Representations 11 (1985) 63-94 [also in J. Winkler and F. Zeitlin (edd.), Nothing to Do With Dionysos? Athenian Drama in its Social Context, 63-96]
  • F. I. Zeitlin, "Playing the Other: Theater, Theatricality, and the Feminine in Greek Drama," in Playing the Other: Gender and Society in Classical Greek Literature, Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1995) / bmcr
  • B. Zweig, "The Mute Nude Female Characters in Aristophanes' Plays," in Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome edited by A. Richlin (1991) 73-89
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