Dyads, Triads and Consumer Treachery: When Interpersonal Connections Guard Against Brand Cheating

by Miranda Goode, Mansur Khamitov, Matthew Thomson
Citation
Title:
Dyads, Triads and Consumer Treachery: When Interpersonal Connections Guard Against Brand Cheating
Author:
Miranda Goode, Mansur Khamitov, Matthew Thomson
Year: 
2015
Publication: 
Strong Brands, Strong Relationships
Volume: 
Issue: 
Start Page: 
216
End Page: 
232
Publisher: 
Routledge/Taylor & Francis
Language: 
English
URL: 
https://www.routledge.com/Strong-Brands-Strong-Relationships/Fournier-Breazeale-Avery/p/book/9781138786837
Select license: 
Creative Commons Attributions-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
DOI: 
PMID: 
ISSN: 
Abstract:

Consumers develop committed and meaningful relationships with brands, yet still sometimes buy or use options that compete directly with these ‘relationship partners’, an activity that might be understood as a form of cheating or infidelity. Using data from three studies, we assess whether so-called triadic brand relationships – those that implicate an interpersonal third party (i.e., some form of interpersonal bond) – safeguard against cheating. We find compared to dyadic brand relationships that implicate only the consumer and the brand, triadic brand relationships protect against emotional and behavioral cheating by virtue of reinforcing expectations of consumer’s exclusive behavior and monogamy within the relationship.

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